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The Scoop – CES Odyssey | What Hospital Leaders Want | Obamacare for Physicians in 2014 January 8, 2014

Filed under: Corporate — CMI/Compas @ 7:15 pm

It seems that part of the CES experience is the Odyssey-like journey there, and our team is no exception: canceled flights, huge cab lines, and cap it off with a huge wait at the registration desk. (Maybe they should have tried this mode of transportation?) But boy, is it worth it, reports VP of Product Development Karel Lahmy, who shared the following from his first afternoon there: “Since it’s my first time it was a bit overwhelming at the beginning but I did manage to cover most of the booths, the biggest thing is (not surprising) tablets and smartphones – tons of booths just for smartphone and tablet accessories. As for the bigger players (LG, Panasonic, Sony) you got the usual crazy new TVs (Ultra HD and 3D). LG had a huge 3D screen. All TVs are now smart TVs – connected to the Internet with native browser – but the big new thing is the interactive ads. I did not see either fitbit or Jawbone which is weird, will look for them tomorrow; however the biggest thing in regards to wearable technology came from Intel: the Edison.” And our EVP Eugene Lee made it there at 1 am last night, and tweeting with the hashtag #CMIatCES has gotten him invited to inside glances at new product launches. You can see photos from the CES floor – updated in real-time – on our Facebook page, and videos to come as well. And speaking of wearable launches at CES, it’s not just about fitness – a company called Nonin has launched a DTC Bluetooth wireless finger pulse oximeter. A new Accenture study shows that 43% of Americans are interested in purchasing health trackers. A fashion show last night featured robots and exoskeletons as models – you can see photos on our Twitter feed. ReadWriteWeb offers a great look at how the tech launched so far at CES will affect everyday life, from doctor’s visit to home. And finally – I mean FINALLY – companies have started launching wearables that are jewelry. Nice.

So since we’re on health tech, what do hospital leaders want? A new ECRI Institute report offers insight: big data tools, intelligent pills, computer-assisted sedation systems. The way things are going, that will probably be what’s hot at CES 2015. (Thanks to CMIO Susan Dorfman for this story.)

One of the most buzzed-about stories in health these last few weeks is the tragic story of a little girl declared brain dead after a surgery; CNN explores what “brain dead” means, and why the term may be misleading.

Lead counsel from the ACP shares what physicians expect can from Obamacare in 2014, as he explains that misinformation is causing major problems. His article points out that doctors have to be ready for patients’ confusion about both formulary rules and overall costs, and some patients may think they’re insured when they haven’t correctly signed up. In a related story, health systems report they’re overwhelmed with calls from newly-insured consumers who are confused about the system.

A new study published in the journal Health Services Research, Healthcare IT News reports that the majority (75%) of doctors who used EHRs in 2011 found it to have clinical benefits. Experts quoted on the study feel that this is a good sign for EHR use.

I can’t help but add one more CES launch – the Powermat dongle: coming to a Starbucks near you.

– Carly Kuper, VP, Strategic Marketing & Corporate Communications

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