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The Scoop – Above/Below the Fold | JAMA Looks at FDA | Companies to Watch January 23, 2014

Filed under: Corporate — CMI/Compas @ 5:12 pm

A recent article asks if “the fold” is still relevant, so I asked Senior Director, Insights & Analytics Leanne Smith to weigh in: “While some people still think above and below the fold – that is changing with the infiltration of consuming content on smart phones and tablets. Website publishers are also putting more valuable content below the fold. However, the real reason above / below the fold is no longer relevant is we now have better ways to measure viewability (50% of the ad is viewed for at least 1 second – IAB definition/standard). With CMI/Compas’ partnership with comScore, we will now be able to measure viewability on approximately 80% of all ads served, which is a better metric than being concerned if the ad is above or the below the fold.”

A correction from yesterday’s scoop on Meaningful Use 2 – a typo said there were 14 capabilities to support, but the correct number is 20. The updated version is below in full.

The Wall Street Journal reports on a JAMA article that found 1/3 of FDA-approved drugs from 2005-2012 were approved based on results from a single large clinical trial.

Here’s two companies to watch, each backed by industry veterans: MDLive is looking to improve our nation’s healthcare system via telemedicine by improving the virtual doctor’s office and is backed by former Apple exec John Sculley and entrepreneur Randy Parker. A data-focused company called Iodine will be launched by Thomas Goetz to help patients make better informed decisions. If you’re a longtime reader of The Scoop you know that I have a massive crush on Goetz, and that he signed my copy of The Decision Tree in a way that led me to believe it may be mutual (I think his exact words were “all my best”), but slow down Thomas I’m married.

You know how it feels when you accidentally crack your iPhone or iPod screen, and you have to take it back to the Apple store where they tell you that it’s going to cost a ton of money to have it fixed? If you’re nodding, you may enjoy this story of how Apple will have to pay $450k to fix the glass shattered in its New York location by a snow blower.

Correction:
As we move into Meaningful Use Stage 2, adoption is seeming to slow according to new data. I checked in with our EHR expert and CMIO Susan Dorfman who – while she noted she’d like to see the full study, noted that this article is “Very interesting – the study suggests that while roughly 80% of surveyed HCPs have some form of EHR in place, it seems only 13% have stated using it to meet Stage 2 requirements. ‘The Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs are staged in three steps, with increasing requirements for participation. To receive an EHR incentive payment, physicians must show that they are meaningfully using certified EHRs by meeting certain objectives.’ For 56% of these HCPs you can likely attribute this to doctors not having EHR systems with the capabilities to support 20 of the Stage 2 Core Set objectives for meaningful use. However, for those who do, we must also consider that the time and cost it takes to actualize and report on Stage 2 requirements may equate to higher dollars and cents than the penalties or incentives that come with it.” Susan also provided me with a great guide to meaningful use Stage 2 requirements; reply to this email if you’d like me to send you a copy.

-Carly Kuper, VP, Strategic Marketing & Corporate Communications
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