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Where CMI, Compas, Singularity, InfoCures, & MEDtrak Come Together!

The Scoop-Answer Your Audience| Stroke Treatment| Healthcare Webinar Learnings December 18, 2014

Filed under: Corporate — CMI/Compas @ 5:16 pm

This article in Inc. Magazine looks at consumers’ desire for more native advertising versus traditional advertising. Mike Ranalli, SEO Supervisor, draws our attention to this key point:  “70% of Internet users [said they] want to learn about products through content vs. traditional advertisements. The important component of this is realizing how close to home it hits for us. The value of building brand awareness through more traditional means of advertising (digital or otherwise) is undeniable, but as an industry we need to start looking at content as the central tactic that drives all marketing efforts. That means taking more time to educate clients about the shift in needs and starting to think less about what “has worked” and more about what consumers really want in order to answer their questions and instill the confidence in them that they are being answered, not just targeted.”  

IBM has announced a partnership with a NY cancer center to further develop technology that showed very positive results in tests—97% of the time it was able to detect the most serious forms of skin cancer.  

After 30+ years, researchers have finally found a treatment for the most severe and disabling types of stroke.   

Senior Associate, Strategic Marketing & Corporate Communications Theresa Heintz attended the webinar How We View Healthcare in America: Consumer and Provider Perspectives. Her takeaways: 

There are three trends in the healthcare industry that are impacting the way physicians and patients interact and ultimately impact health outcomes:

1.       Anxiety.  Only 1/3 of administrators think the healthcare industry is on track. We’re stuck in a fee for service environment where providers aren’t responsible for managing patient health proactively. It’s a rich conversation, and it means we have to change the model of care.  Access doesn’t mean a patient visit to a physician anymore, rather it means multiple touch points. Doctors see themselves as labor and see administrators as management.  It’s a suit vs. scrubs mentality.  But we do need more physician managers. Physicians don’t want to just ride the bus, they want to help in surviving the bus ride.   

2.       Rising costs- how do we control or reduce costs?

    a.       Prevention

    b.      Reform

    c.       Create an incentive for patients to monitor or reduce their expenditures.

3.       Use of ability to engage around technology.  Social media is pervasive in our society; we’re collecting and generating content faster than we know what to do with it.  There was $2.8 billion spent on wearables this year and we’re expected to grow to $8 billion in the next five years. While social media is everywhere, there are gaps.  More than 7 in 10 consumers own a smart phone or tablet and 76% of that community engages in social, however only 22% of consumers use their devices to look at their health insurance or manage their health.  4 out of 10 app users say some of their apps were recommended to them by a healthcare provider.  Technology is growing and securing the changing relationship between the doctor and the patient.

Opportunities from these trends:

1-We need to move away from volume and move towards value.

2-We need to change how we reimburse and pay for care/maintain wellness. 

3-We need to think beyond the traditional medical model. 

4-We need a more connected environment between patients and providers.

-Amanda Kopec Preto, Manager, Strategic Marketing & Corporate Communications

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